acorn squash pappardelle with leeks, oyster mushrooms & spicy breadcrumbs

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We recently bought a tiny cabin on an island bordering the San Juans and with it came two huge gardens full of vegetables, fruits, herbs and flowers. It has always been a dream of mine to have land to grow enough food to feed my family. There is nothing more fulfilling to me than to go outside with my kids, pick vegetables and immediately come inside to cook them. Plus my children eat way more raw veggies straight out of the ground than they do if I buy it from the store and serve it to them. The other day my daughter tore off a huge leaf of lacinato kale and proceeded to eat the whole thing. I wouldn’t even do that! Whatever the magic of the garden is to them, I’ll take it.

So now that I have this dream come true, it’s beginning to feel like a pretty daunting task. Mostly because this is a part time residence. How can I possibly keep up with it? But I WILL do this people! My first harvest was leeks, squashes, chard, kale, collard greens and parsley. Now what to do with all of this. I really love hearty pasta dishes in the fall. I could eat pasta ev-er-y day. I decided to roast all of the squash because it is really one of my favorite things and so versatile. I ended up using them in salads, enchiladas and risotto for the week. I had some roasted acorn squash leftover so I decided to puree it and use it to make pappardelle noodles to give them a nice sweetness. Tossed with sautéed oyster mushrooms, melted leeks from the garden and topped with spicy breadcrumbs, it ended up being my favorite meal of the week.

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acorn squash pappardelle with oyster mushrooms, leeks & spicy breadcrumbs

serves 4

  • 1 acorn squash
  • 2 leeks
  • 1lb oyster mushrooms
  • 1 cup bread crumbs
  • rosemary- four 3″ sprigs + 1T minced
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1/2 cup white wine
  • 1/2 tsp red pepper flakes
  • 2 T fresh Italian parsley, chopped fine
  • 2 1/2 cups flour
  • 1 egg + 1 egg yolk
  • 3/4 cup grated parmesan
  • kosher salt & fresh ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 400º. Cut the squash into quarters and remove the seeds. Lay skin side down on a baking sheet covered with parchment paper or foil. Drizzle with 1T olive oil, salt & pepper and the rosemary sprigs. Roast in the oven until tender, about 30 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool. Peel the skin off and put half of the squash in a food processor to puree. You should end up with about 1 cup. Reserve the other half of the squash for another use.

Cut the stem and dark green leaves off the leeks then cut in half lengthwise. Rinse under cold water to get any residual dirt that may be hiding in between the layers. Slice the leeks very thin. You should have about 2 cups worth. In a skillet, heat 2T olive oil over medium heat. Add leeks and a pinch of salt and pepper and cook for a minute until they just start to soften. Turn the heat down as low as it will go and cover with a piece of parchment paper then a lid. You want the leeks to steam and get super soft without getting too brown. Stir them up occasionally. It will take about 20-30 minutes for them to get super soft and a bit brown. Set aside.

Cut off the stems to the mushrooms and chop into large even sized pieces. Heat a large skillet with 1T olive oil over medium-high heat and sauté the mushrooms stirring occasionally until they release their liquids and start to brown. Then add the wine, a pinch of salt and pepper and cook for a few minutes more, until most of the wine is absorbed into the mushrooms. There will still be a bit of juice in the pan which is great. You just want to make sure to cook off the alcohol in the wine. Add the leeks to the mushrooms and set aside off the heat.

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In a small skillet, heat 1 T olive oil over medium heat and fry the breadcrumbs stirring often until golden brown and crunchy. Stir in minced rosemary, chile flakes and a pinch of salt and set aside.

For the pasta, put 2 1/4 cups of flour in a large bowl and make a well in the middle of it. Add the squash puree and eggs into the well and with a fork, whisk the eggs into the puree gradually incorporating the flour until everything comes together to form a ball. Transfer the ball onto a floured surface and knead for 5 minutes. You may need to add the remaining 1/4 cup flour gradually if it’s too sticky. Once the dough ball is smooth and elastic, set it aside covered with a kitchen towel for at least 20 minutes.

Once the dough has rested you can start running it through a pasta machine. I use an old fashioned hand cranked one but you can also use the kitchen aid attachment or even a rolling pin. I divide the dough into quarters and run it through the 5th setting on the pasta machine, dusting with flour as you go to prevent sticking. You want the sheets to be very thin but not too thin that it tears or is translucent. Think the thickness of a dime or 1/32″. Once all of the sheets are rolled out, cut them into 1″ thick noodles, tossing with more flour to prevent them from sticking together.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. While you are waiting, heat up the skillet with the leeks and mushrooms over medium heat. Toss the noodles into the boiling water, cover and cook 1-2 minutes. Do not over cook or the noodles will get mushy. Drain the noodles reserving 1/2 cup of the cooking water and immediately transfer the noodles to the skillet with the leeks & mushrooms. Add 2 tablespoons olive oil and half of the reserved cooking liquid tossing to coat all of the noodles. If they seem too dry, add the rest of the cooking liquid and another tablespoon olive oil. Remove from heat and toss with the parsley and parmesan. Serve immediately topped with a handful of bread crumbs.

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nettle gnocchi in parmesan brodo with spicy pork meatballs

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Every week my first stop at the farmers market is Foraged and Found Edibles. Whatever they have always sets the tone for our meals for the week. They are chefs turned foragers who harvest wild foods from the surrounding Seattle area and always have an amazing selection of things you will most likely never find in the grocery store. This last visit confirmed that Spring is in fact HERE and I walked away with wild nettles, fiddlehead ferns, miner’s lettuce and watercress filling my bag to the brim.

What I was especially excited about though were the nettles. The seasonal window of time is so brief for these barbed little things. February and March is prime for eating them as by April they start to become coarse and you should not eat them once they start to form flowers. If you are lucky enough to have them grow wild in your neighborhood, pick only the tips. The first 4 to 6 leaves on each spear are the most tender. Don’t forget to always wear heavy gloves and long sleeves when handling these ferociously stingy things but don’t worry, once cooked, the sting dies off.

It will probably come as a surprise to you (as it did to me) that nettles beat both spinach and broccoli in their richness in vitamins and minerals, particularly vitamin C and iron. A tea made by steeping nettle leaves has long been used as a tonic. The flavor is similar to spinach and can be used in its place in most recipes. My favorite ways to eat them is on pizza, or made into a soup or pesto. Here I’m trying something new and putting them in gnocchi paired with bite size spicy pork meatballs all swimming in a nutty parmesan broth. For a veggie option you can replace the meatballs with cannelloni beans. Adding fresh peas would also be delicious.

I hope next time you see nettles at the market or growing along the sidewalk, you snatch some up and discover how tasty and healthy they really are!

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